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Posts tagged media

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Is 'checkbook journalism' the new normal?

An interesting article in the New York Times about the so-called “checkbook journalism” that seems to be running rampant at U.S. television networks today. The article comes on the heels of ABC paying up to $15,000 to get photos from Meagan Broussard — one of the women who sent Anthony Weiner photos of herself (and ABC anchor Chris Cuomo defending the payout).

Filed under journalism media U.S. networks ABC NBC state of the media

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Small Town Journo: STJ's Social Media Rule No. 1

Love this. Great advice.

mvhannigan-smalltownjournalist:


Rule 1: Never Tweet, Facebook or post anything that you wouldn’t put in the print edition.

I’m not talking about the AP Stylebook here and I am not talking about needing a complete story. Great social media - and great conversation starters on your network - can come from a single fact or…

(via mvhannigan-smalltownjournalist-)

Filed under journalism media social media

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In a do-what-you-do-best-and-link-to-the-rest ecosystem, if someone else has written a good article (or background wiki) isn’t it often more efficient to link than to write? Isn’t it more valuable to add reporting, filling in missing facts or correcting mistakes or adding perspectives, than to rewrite what someone else has already written?

We write articles for many reasons: because the form demands it, because we want the bylines and ego gratification, because we are competitive, because we had to. Now we should write articles when necessary.

Jeff Jarvis on the article as luxury or byproduct and the changing paradigms of journalism in the age of the social web. (via curiositycounts)

(via curiositycounts)

Filed under journalism media Internet web 2.0

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This was a tweet sent out by the Poynter Institute on Thursday after the New York Times announced the appointment of Jill Abramson as the paper’s new executive editor (she takes over in September from Bill Keller).
In the Poynter post written by Jill Geisler, Geisler sees this as a big victory for Abramson — and for women journalists everywhere.
She writes:

According to the latest ASNE census,  women hold just 34.6 percent of the supervisory roles at today’s  newspapers. Abramson’s promotion doesn’t move the needle much on that  number right now. But it can help.

Geisler states three things that may be accomplished by Abramson’s appointment:
 It may influence publishers to promote women — who they might of overlooked — to top-level management 
It may help women stay in the industry long enough to be promoted to those top-level jobs
And it can help motivate female journalism students that they too might one day be a top-level manager.
Geisier notes she came of age in the 1970s when women were not welcomed in newsrooms, and faced stereotypes and harassment in the workplace.
I did not come of age at this time and in the 10-plus years I have been in the business, I’ve never had a problem with anyone in any newsroom treating me any different because I’m a woman.
I wonder if the reason so few women are in these positions because a) they’re not old enough to be in them yet (senior managers are not usually part of the younger demographic); or b) because they just don’t want them.
I think it’s great the New York Times has hired its first female executive editor, and I hope other papers follow suit.
But I hope they do so because the woman in question is deserving, not just because the Times did it.

This was a tweet sent out by the Poynter Institute on Thursday after the New York Times announced the appointment of Jill Abramson as the paper’s new executive editor (she takes over in September from Bill Keller).

In the Poynter post written by Jill Geisler, Geisler sees this as a big victory for Abramson — and for women journalists everywhere.

She writes:

According to the latest ASNE census, women hold just 34.6 percent of the supervisory roles at today’s newspapers. Abramson’s promotion doesn’t move the needle much on that number right now. But it can help.

Geisler states three things that may be accomplished by Abramson’s appointment:

  • It may influence publishers to promote women — who they might of overlooked — to top-level management
  • It may help women stay in the industry long enough to be promoted to those top-level jobs
  • And it can help motivate female journalism students that they too might one day be a top-level manager.

Geisier notes she came of age in the 1970s when women were not welcomed in newsrooms, and faced stereotypes and harassment in the workplace.

I did not come of age at this time and in the 10-plus years I have been in the business, I’ve never had a problem with anyone in any newsroom treating me any different because I’m a woman.

I wonder if the reason so few women are in these positions because a) they’re not old enough to be in them yet (senior managers are not usually part of the younger demographic); or b) because they just don’t want them.

I think it’s great the New York Times has hired its first female executive editor, and I hope other papers follow suit.

But I hope they do so because the woman in question is deserving, not just because the Times did it.

Filed under Media Journalism Women Newspapers New York Times

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Cool.
pewinternet:

New Media Timeline (1969-2010)
We just stumbled across Poynter’s fantastically useful timeline covering the history of new media and online journalism from 1969 to 2010. You weren’t planning on getting any work done this morning, right?

Cool.

pewinternet:

New Media Timeline (1969-2010)

We just stumbled across Poynter’s fantastically useful timeline covering the history of new media and online journalism from 1969 to 2010. You weren’t planning on getting any work done this morning, right?

Filed under Journalism Media Internet History

3 notes &

From Poynter:

The New York Times is turning off the automatic feed for its main  Twitter account this week in an experiment to determine if a human-run,  interactive approach will be more effective.

Good idea or bad idea?
IMO, it’s likely the former (and about time!). I wonder how many other news organizations will follow suit after the Times announcement.
I also wonder what relationship — if any — this move has with the Times paywall.

From Poynter:

The New York Times is turning off the automatic feed for its main Twitter account this week in an experiment to determine if a human-run, interactive approach will be more effective.

Good idea or bad idea?

IMO, it’s likely the former (and about time!). I wonder how many other news organizations will follow suit after the Times announcement.

I also wonder what relationship — if any — this move has with the Times paywall.

Filed under journalism Media Newspapers Social media Twitter